Brothers

My boys could not be more opposite – I mean in almost EVERY WAY.

They look different. They prefer completely different foods, games, shows, pass times – you name it, it’s different.

They are wonderfully complex. It is my hope that sharing details of their lives  will give you a little more insight into the way God is growing all of us.

I also want to do this in a way that protects their privacy.  So, instead of using their first names (you already know mine and Mick’s), I am officially sharing with you their nicknames. They are silly, but so very appropriate.

Allow me to introduce my sons, Sourdough and Bacon.

boys on steps

Sourdough

You have already heard a lot about him. Sourdough is my first born. He is extremely intelligent, eleven years old, crazy into the Percy Jackson Book series, gardening, cooking and, as you know cultivating microbes.

His nickname actually comes from his ongoing desire to have a sourdough starter in his room.

My sweet yet salty little Sourdough was diagnosed last year with High Functioning Autism, Anxiety Disorder and was also classified as highly gifted. He has significant sensory issues (especially sound, taste, touch, texture, and smell), some academic delays, some extremely advanced academic function, and all kinds of fun things in between.

Although emotions are not easy for him, he gives the  best hugs around and still likes showing me all of his favorite things (over and over and over sometimes) .

He made me a momma for the first time. I love him, all of him, no matter what.

Bacon

Bacon is eight. You have not heard as much about him, yet.  He is snuggly and loud and dirty and playful. He loves football, basketball, tennis, ANYTHING that involves moving his body. He loves all animals, especially snakes (Lord, please help me). He is the outdoorsy, athlete type, but is also so, so sensitive.

You can imagine, after my description of Sourdough, that Bacon’s personality and interests might clash violently a bit with his brother’s sensitivities.

His nickname comes from the simple fact that he will eat bacon, every single day, all day long. There is not a day that goes by that he does not ask for bacon. My friend took him to lunch once and a piece of bacon fell out of his sandwich and onto the table. He quickly picked it up, popped it into his mouth, and turned to her saying, “My motto is ‘No Bacon Left Behind!'”. Bacon just loves him some bacon.

My delicious little Bacon was also diagnosed this last year. He is classified as highly gifted, but struggles with dyslexia and processing issues. He also has some unexplained neurological issues, the most consistent of which is a bad case of restless leg syndrome. He struggles more with understanding/accepting/loving his brother than he does with anything a doctor has ever diagnosed him with.

He is my baby. I love him, all of him, no matter what.

In upcoming posts, I hope to share more  about these guys. In the meantime, I leave you with a personal note –

my favorite easy breakfast has always been sourdough toast with two slices of bacon!

toast and bacon

 

 

30 thoughts on “Brothers

  1. I think that yes, it’s fair. As long as you have the support sseytm (emotional, social, financial) in place so that you will be able to care for both children, and provide for both of their needs which may be very different. As long as one of the kids is not neglected due to the needs of the other child, I think it could be a pretty fantastic experience for everyone involved I am an autistic and adopted only child parenting an autistic only child and I think that the one thing missing from our family is another child. If I were to adopt, I’d lean toward adopting a child with autism, as I can’t imagine raising a non-autistic child or attempting to balance raising one of each (for lack of a better term). I wish we had the option to add another child to our family, but I feel like I’m strapped already (I have rheumatoid/autoimmune arthritis and spine damage). Hope this helps Let us know what you decide!

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