Grieving My Child’s Diagnosis

When I was in high school, I learned about Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's Five Stages of Grief (the stages we go through when we are processing a significant loss or change). It was part of an assignment for a speech I was working on in debate class. Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance I still have them memorized. One of the things I remember learning about...Read More

The Hardest Part Of Homeschooling My Children With Special Needs

My child ate kleenex in his therapy session last week. He nonchalantly picked up the box, pulled out a few pieces and started taking bites like it was a turkey sandwich. When he was done, he broke the box itself in half, put it on his head like a hat, and got back to coloring the picture the psychiatrist had asked him to draw....Read More

Sometimes The Basics Are The Most Difficult

My son showed me exactly how he planned to install a CPU into his computer yesterday. (If you don't know what that is, don't worry. You are in good company. I listen to my son tell me all about computer parts for most of the day, every day, and I am still not 100% sure I know what it really is.) He walked me...Read More

When Your Child Has Autism

My oldest son was diagnosed with autism when he was just shy of ten years old. But he has lived with it his entire life. From a few days old until today, at age fourteen, my son has been teaching me all about autism. Sometimes, it's really, really difficult. Sometimes, he takes my breath away with all his talents and abilities. Most of the...Read More

The Constant Vigilance Of Parenting A Child With Special Needs

"It feels like our lives are totally out of control. And there is nothing I can do about it," my husband replied. I looked at my son's doctor, wondering what she might say. She looked down at her paper and wrote something. I glanced at my husband, and gave him a weak smile. "He's not used to this," I thought. "I'm usually the one...Read More